Let's rethink everything

Events

 

EVENTS

 

Multilingual Amsterdam - Education #2
Oct
30
8:00 PM20:00

Multilingual Amsterdam - Education #2

Amsterdam counts as many as 180 different nationalities. Over half of school kids in Amsterdam speak one or more languages other than Dutch. Sometimes over 10 different languages prevail in just one classroom. How do we manage multilingualism in education? Multiple studies show that children learn faster and better when taught in their native language. They achieve better results and don’t fall behind throughout the year. Nonetheless, policymakers, educators and even parents resist curricula that enable multilingualism in the classroom. This second edition of Multilingual Amsterdam will focus on emotions in the discussion on multilingualism in education. With Ellen-Rose Kambel, Glenn Helberg, Maria Stock, Rasit Elibol, Jakhini Bisselink, Simion Blom, Valeria Pierdominici and Elma Blom.

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Multilingual Amsterdam - Education #1
Jul
18
7:30 PM19:30

Multilingual Amsterdam - Education #1

Amsterdam counts as many as 180 different nationalities. Over half of school kids in Amsterdam speaks at least one language other than Dutch. Classrooms are likely to become even more multilingual in the future. The Network for Multilingual Parents Amsterdam (Netwerk Meertalige Ouders Amsterdam) together with the Rutu Foundation, Sirius Network for education for children of migrants (Sirius Network voor onderwijs aan migrantenkinderen), Rethink Amsterdam, Foundation Polish centre for Education and Culture Lokomotywa and STOC (Foundation Turkish Education Centre), present a program on the role of language in matters of educational inequality. We invite all parents, policymakers and educators to join us and think about ways to create inclusive educational policies in which all kids can thrive in their own ways.

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Docu: Britain's Forgotten Slave Owners
Jun
22
7:30 PM19:30

Docu: Britain's Forgotten Slave Owners

In what ways did slavery contribute to today's London in becoming world power?

The BBC documentary ‘Britain’s Forgotten Slave-Owners’ is based on thorough academic research, written and presented by David Olusoga. Olusoga reveals aspects of Britain’s spectacular industrialisation and how London's wealth, urban plan, political and economic infrastructures all have links to slave-derived wealth. Follow the money: Ultimately, we discover that the country’s debt to slavery is far greater than previously thought, shaping everything from the nation’s property landscape to its ideas about race. A legacy that can still be felt today. A documentary that makes you think about our Amsterdam. Join this special WeMakethe.City screening from Rethink Amsterdam. 

Follow the money
Nearly £17bn in today’s money was paid to the British slave owners to compensate them for the loss of their human property when slavery was abolished in 1834. A 10-man committee divvied up nearly £17bn in today’s money among 46,000 claimants stretching across the entire British empire. Not a penny, of course, was paid to the slaves themselves. An interesting detail, more than 40 per cent of all slave owners were women. The documentary investigates who owned what and what happened to the wealth generated by the slave-system and compensation pay-out.

The compensation money was drawn largely from taxes, which effectively meant the poor paid for it. The slave owners who had already grown fat on the profits of slave labor were able to diversify, investing in industry, insurance and institutions whose income streams would balance each others’ fluctuations out and keep flowing down the generations. This useful injection of taxpayer cash enabled its recipients to concentrate on building country piles, grooming their sons for government and ensuring that no more than seven families actually matter in Britain at any one time.

Rethink Amsterdam screens this documentary because it offers tools to rethink about our city, Amsterdam, and how it relates to slavery. How many billions were paid in the Netherlands, to whom, and how is that process and history still shaping our current life? Questions we will tackle in the next events.

The documentary was originally broadcasted in July 2015 on BBC2. The program won the BAFTA (British Academy of Film and Television Arts) TV award for 2016 in the ‘Specialist factual’ category and it also won the Royal Historical Society Public History Prize Winner for Broadcasting. English, no subtitles. This one hour documentary is the first part of 2 parts.

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Docu: Namrud (Troublemaker)
Mar
18
7:30 PM19:30

Docu: Namrud (Troublemaker)

Dutch première: a film about a vegan rebel from Nazareth. Followed by Q&A with the Nazarene.

Palestinian Jowan Safadi is a famous free-spirit and singer songwriter in Israel and the Middle-East. The son of a carpenter from Nazareth, he is a rebel and prominent social conscious. The Arab Spring did not produce new political parties, it is a real cultural revolution and he is at its core. Jowan's lyrics, at once penetrating and witty, have also courted controversy on several occasions: previously investigated for nearly three years in Israel for "inciting terrorism", his last tour to Jordan ended with his arrest and an overnight stay in a prison cell. Jowan sings about the love of his she-dog, about sex, race/ism, refugees, religion and power-politics with near Haiku type lyrics and humour.

The Arab Spring is still alive
He performs in Berlin, Cairo, Oslo, Amman, Helsinki, Brussels, Tel-Aviv and naturally Nazareth. Jowan tackles taboos in a gentle and near philosophical way, both in ‘western’ and ‘eastern’ worlds. Jowan is also a single dad to 15-year-old son Don who lived in the US. The friendly and aggressive verbal exchanges between father and son shape this film. In addition to social questions, he is confronted with parenting in a confused and violent region. How do you balance between the pressure to adapt and a conscious needing rebellion?What does it mean to be a man in today’s world? A Palestinian? An Israeli? A single dad, a teen-ager, an artist, a vegan or Muslim? Mainly, what does it take to be human in today’s world? Thought provoking, beautiful, funny, touching and a fresh insight on the cultural revolution that has not died in the Middle East.

English subtitles. Language: Arabic, English, Hebrew
Original Title: Namrud (Troublemaker)
Length: 94 minutes
Release date: November 3, 2017, Austria
Director: Fernando Romero Forsthuber
Dutch première

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Docu: Drie Vrouwen (Three Women)
Mar
8
7:30 PM19:30

Docu: Drie Vrouwen (Three Women)

Three women, each in their own way, plead for a worthy acknowledgement of the Dutch history of slavery.

What happens when you research your family history and what you find is a photo of the slave owner of your ancestors? What do you see and hear if you wander around Dutch museums and stumble upon centuries-old paintings with African child slaves? Which stories lay hidden behind historical house facades in The Hague? And most of all, what of the meaning of this all for a collective Dutch identity? For her newest documentary, director Ida Does filmed heritage expert Valika Smeulders, winti priest Marian Markelo and researcher Ellen-Rose Kambel. All explore colonial history in the Netherlands in their own way.

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Flight Route Special: New Voices for Europe
Jan
18
8:00 PM20:00

Flight Route Special: New Voices for Europe

Newcomers are not represented in democracy. How can they be involved in decision-making processes in their new European communities?

Today, more than a million refugees live in Europe, but their voices are still not represented. They don’t have the right to vote or stand up in an election. Leaving them trapped in a chain of challenges where they don’t have the means to tackle them. We need to go beyond the idea that democracy is just casting a ballot. That’s why newcomers took an initiative for a G-100, based on the G-1000 ‘Burgertop’, to speak up. The most important issues by the G-100 are presented by the New Voices for Europe Council. How do they deal with education, housing and work in the European communities they now live in? And how can they transform their voices into practical recommendations to influence integration policies of cities, states, and the EU – now and in the future?

New voices for Europe Council

The New Voices for Europe council is a table with politicians, experts, and refugee representatives. The refugee representatives will present certain policy recommendations regarding integration policy and then each member of the council will have the time to react to this statement. How can we solve this? How can we implement such a solution/policy?

About G-100

G-100 is a refugee-led initiative by Diaspora Networks Alliance (DNA) and a series of conferences in Europe. It takes inspiration from the ‘G-1000 initiative’, also known as the Burgertop. The structure of G-100 is a workshop where around 100 newcomers, former refugees who share the same experience, and European experts, politicians meet to discuss and deliberate about different challenges that they are facing. These meetings take place in different European cities where these challenges exist. In collaboration with Syrian Volunteers in the Netherlands (SYVNL), G-100 is starting in Amsterdam, and then it makes its way to Brussels and Berlin.

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Rethink New Amsterdam
Nov
30
7:30 PM19:30

Rethink New Amsterdam

New York to Amsterdam, 1667 to 2017, slavery has transcended time and space. We explore the collective past of Amsterdam and New York as it lives in the present and set the tone for change in the future.

We are showing 3 stories, in an unorthodox way, from the mapping slavery book “Dutch New York histories” that connect to present-day New York and to present-day Amsterdam. 3 figures, 3 marks of slavery in the present day. By showing these connections we uncover a hidden history on how society operates around blackness. In the manner of presenting these new narratives we hope to lay a base for changing how society deals with blackness through inspiring a different way of practising education especially concerning slavery. Join our time travels and rethink new and old Amsterdam.

 

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Rethink Aleppo. The City Always Wins.
May
5
4:30 PM16:30

Rethink Aleppo. The City Always Wins.

Aleppo is one of the oldest cities in the world and has been rebuilt many times before. We will dive into history and the elements that make Aleppo, a distinct city with AlHakam Shaar from The Aleppo Project and Dutch Historian Geert Mak. Then we look into historical examples of rebuilding cities from Afghanistan to Macedonia. After that, young Syrian designers will share their sense of design of Syrian homes. We are then ready to imagine future scenarios for Aleppo. You can choose one of three workshops on future city making. Join us and contribute to cutting edge ideas, disruptive innovations, out of the box efforts, hardcore research and diverse networks about place making and building future cities. Naturally, exercises in hopeful futures include music, films, beauty and dinner!

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Us vs Them? Docu: Muslims Like Us
Mar
31
7:30 PM19:30

Us vs Them? Docu: Muslims Like Us

In the BBC program Muslims Like Us , ten British Muslims live together for a week in order to discover what it means to be Islamic in Great Britain. The differences in the way participants practise their religion cause fierce arguments as well as new insights among them. Where some claim that an orthodox approach to belief and religion is the only righteous approach, others plead for a more liberal attitude, which they believe allows for better integration into Great Britain. We are screening the first episode of the two-part series.

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